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Columns Growing in Faith Science & Catholicism

A scientific thinker with the heart of an ascetic

Just south of Goose Island here in Chicago sits a church recently voted the most beautiful in America by 16,000 online supporters. Named for the Polish Saint John Cantius (spelled

Columns Growing in Faith Science & Catholicism

Finding God in all things, including polymerized acetylene

As was the case with so many of the other 19th-century and early 20th-century Catholic university figures, Julius Nieuwland (1878-1936) was an immigrant. Virtually all of the Catholic institutions of

Columns Growing in Faith Science & Catholicism

‘God’s architect,’ blending knowledge of science and art

A perhaps unsurprising number of my favorite buildings in the world are churches, from grand basilicas to underground catacombs to hospital chapels. Due to my many personal connections there, one

Columns Science & Catholicism

‘A community of all peoples to live over the face of the earth’

On June 14, 2016, Google’s frequent “doodles” which honor holidays, anniversaries, and famous people depicted a mustachioed cartoon scientist standing next to red vials of blood. This much-viewed global memorial

Columns Science & Catholicism

Thoughts on cosmic death and resurrection

Heidi Ann Russell’s still relatively recent (2015) book “Quantum Shift: Theological and Pastoral Implications of Contemporary Developments in Science” contains a number of fascinating chapters on topics of interest to

Columns Science & Catholicism

The man who mastered the Rosetta Stone

What child has not had their imagination captured while wandering around a museum of mummies and sarcophagi and artifacts engraved with ancient hieroglyphics? Modern archeology in many aspects can be

Columns Science & Catholicism

The priest who was the father of the Big Bang Theory

How can a reasonable and educated Catholic square the Adam and Eve account(s) in Genesis with the cosmological discoveries of the scientific age? Are these aetiologies of natural and human

Columns Science & Catholicism

The Jesuit known as the ‘father of aeronautics’

Commissioned to do some global engagement work for the university, I’ve clocked quite a bit of international travel this year, which has demanded a staggering amount of hours on flights.

Columns Science & Catholicism

Encouraging study of the heavens, theologically and practically

“The Heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they reveal knowledge.” So begins

Columns Science & Catholicism

A French Catholic and his mission to the blind

The church’s historical commitment to the humanities, philosophy, art, medicine and literacy (at least among ecclesiastical leaders) is well-known, especially after the Carolingian monastic movement turned centers of prayer into